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Oceans

Oceans

The History of Ocean Pollution and Where It’s Headed

June 22, 2020
ocean pollution

Our oceans amass more than 70% of the Earth’s surface – and for years, they’ve served as landfills. Before experts started to analyze these practices, many people believed these waterways could hold an unlimited amount of waste. Unfortunately, extensive research shows that’s not the case whatsoever.

Within the past few decades, we’ve come to know that our previous actions have caused immense damage. Still, what’s next for ocean pollution? Take a look.

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Oceans

10 Beach Cleanup Facts of 2020

June 10, 2020
beach cleanup facts

Most people look forward to summer because they can head to the beach with their friends and family. It’s a beautiful place to relax and enjoy splashing around in the waves, but only if it’s a trash-free environment. 

Beaches see some of the highest amounts of pollution because it’s easy for tourists to dump waste. It’s also where waterways bring their floating debris. Anyone who wants to do their part to make the earth a better place to live may start with changes in their personal life. However, don’t forget that you can always head to the beach and make an immediate difference.

Check out these 10 beach cleanup facts of 2020 that will encourage you on your sustainability journey. 

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Oceans

5 Types of Ocean Pollution and How We Can Stop Them

June 5, 2020
types of ocean pollution

Around the world, pollution affects many of our waterways. However, several different kinds of contamination exist – and each one hurts our oceans significantly. To put a stop to these harmful factors, we need to learn more. Then, we can understand how it influences the lives of people and animals and permanently changes our environment.

Take a look at five types of ocean pollution. 

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Oceans

What Does Ocean Habitat Destruction Mean for Our Planet?

March 27, 2020
ocean habitat destruction

Human activities have been affecting our oceans and the life within them for centuries. But, only recently has the world begun to notice these detrimental effects. From low oxygen levels to ocean oil slicks, entire marine ecosystems are rapidly taking a turn for the worse. In many areas, our actions have even created unlivable ocean conditions, endangering marine life and, therein affecting our own economy and food supply. If we hope to recover from these effects, we must work together to restore the marine ecosystems we’ve so carelessly destroyed. 

Polluted Seas

As humanity’s dependency on plastic continues to grow, so will its effect on ocean habitats. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch, for instance, stretches 1.6 million square kilometers and largely consists of plastic objects and small microplastics. Marine animals mistake this floating debris for food, but these plastics are indigestible, filling their stomachs until they starve. Thes plastic particles also spread hazardous chemicals that can climb up the food chain and destroy entire ecosystems. Currently, ocean debris directly affects more than 800 marine species.

Humanity’s demand for oil has also resulted in a more polluted ocean. Oil spills contribute about 12% of all ocean oil, while shipping, drains, dumping and drilling produce the other 88%. New methods of hunting for oil also have a significant impact on marine life. Seismic blasts used to detect new drill sites have decreased the number of zooplankton, which are an essential food and oxygen source for many species like fish and whales. Therefore, increased drilling operations have the potential to affect every level of the aquatic food chain.

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Oceans

The State of the World Water Crisis in 2020

March 11, 2020
water crisis 2020

As the global population grows and climate change makes rain unpredictable, we’ve started to run out of drinkable freshwater. 

Researchers have become increasingly confident that available freshwater will decrease over the coming years — some are even estimating that there could be a worldwide water shortage as soon as 2040.

Here’s the state of the world water crisis in 2020 — and what we may be able to do to beat global water scarcity.

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Environment, Oceans

10 Water Conservation Techniques in Agriculture

January 22, 2020
water conservation techniques in agriculture

Water is essential for life, but it is also an integral part of modern agriculture. We often plant in areas that don’t receive enough annual rainfall to support the crops we need to grow to feed the country and the world. This is where irrigation techniques come in — but as with most things, they’re not all created equal. As the population grows and water becomes an even more valuable resource, conservation techniques will become a requirement in the agriculture industry. Here are 10 water conservation techniques you can use today, whether you’re seeding a farm or just growing a garden in your backyard. 

1. Drip Irrigation

Drip irrigation isn’t a new concept, but as water conservation continues to grow in importance, it will likely gain popularity. Instead of irrigating the entire plant from above, drip irrigation uses pipes to drip water slowly onto the roots of the plants. This conserves between 20-50% of the water you would otherwise use in irrigation while reducing other negatives like runoff, surface evaporation and the potential for overwatering.

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Oceans

Sustainable Irrigation Systems to Reduce Agricultural Water Waste

January 8, 2020
sustainable irrigation

Agriculture, especially on large factory farms, is massively water-intensive —  according to the USDA, agriculture accounts for around 80% of all H2O use in the United States. As a result, many farmers are looking for ways to reduce waste and improve their farms’ sustainability.

Traditional irrigation systems can be wasteful in many different ways. However, they don’t have to be. With the right design, they can use as little water as possible while still providing enough to plants without reducing yields.

Here’s how farmers can reduce agricultural water waste with the right irrigation system design.

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Environment, Oceans

With the Rise of Sustainability, Will We See Suburban Water Change?

December 18, 2019
suburban water

Sustainability is becoming a popular topic around the world. Big consumer pushes over the past few years — like the movement to ban plastic straws — demonstrate that people will go out of their way to save the environment.

Some of the most significant sustainability challenges, however, don’t come from the places you expect. When you think about water pollution, the first image that comes to mind is a factory or power plant — wastewater flowing into a river or water source. Yet in much of the country, this image isn’t entirely accurate. The majority of water pollution today comes from the suburbs.

With the pivot towards sustainability, will customers bring eco-friendly habits home and reduce the pollution produced by suburban water use?

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Environment, Oceans

Alternative Water Sources to Consider for Going Off the Grid

November 25, 2019
alternative water sources

Not all water comes from a city tap. Sure, it’s convenient to link up with a supplier who funnels H2O straight to your home. However, it’s not always the earth-friendliest or safest. Plus, you’re beholden to a company and a monthly bill. The city-wide water supply can pause or shut down in case of a major emergency. If you’ve set up a self-reliant system, however, you have less to worry about.

Are you ready to go off of the grid? If so, consider one of these five alternative water sources for your home.

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Environment, Oceans

Homesteading Water Supply Options

November 13, 2019
homesteading water supply

Homesteading is a lifestyle characterized by self-sufficiency and independence from living on the grid. Homesteader’s invest in subsistence agriculture, preservation of food and raising livestock or other animals to provide a self-sustaining life. However, water supply is a source of strife for many individuals who invest in living independently from the grid. When buying a homestead, you should prioritize your water source when looking for a home. If you already own a property but do not have a viable source of water, there are alternative solutions available.

Dig a Well

Digging a well on your property creates a reliable source of water that your household can depend upon. Although digging a well is expensive, upwards of $10,000, it allows you to be entirely off the grid and self-sufficient. Wells are perhaps the best long-term solution for homesteads that desire a reliable source of water while remaining independent from the grid.

It is essential to decide whether your well will have a manual pump or an electric pump and if it has an electric pump how it will be powered. Manual pumps require more manual labor, but it ensures that you always have a source of water. Electric pumps allow for an automated water source, but it does rely on outside factors. Electric pumps are either powered by the grid, which can defeat the purpose of a well for some, or they are reliant upon solar or wind power, which puts your homestead at the mercy of the weather. These factors are all considerations when installing a well at your property.

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Ocean Conservation Blog

 
With more plastic infiltrating even the most remote parts of our oceans, understanding the issues facing our seas can help us meet the challenge.
 
In this section, we’ll address current issues surrounding the oceans, such as plastic pollution, water quality and marine health. We’ll also cover tips in how to reduce your impact on our oceans as well as current technology and studies showing promise of a better future for the sea. I hope you enjoy reading!