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Ocean Conservation

Oceans

How Does Contaminated Flood Water Affects Our Health?

August 26, 2019
contaminated flood water

A flood is a natural occurrence where water covers once-dry land. It can have a positive impact on an ecosystem, especially one experiencing prolonged drought. Unfortunately for most, it can also have a deadly effect.

Flooding typically happens after heavy rainfall when waterways – like rivers, creeks and ponds – can’t hold the new water. In coastal cities, tropical cyclones, tsunamis and high tide combined with high river levels cause floods.

Natural disasters are worsening with global warming. As temperatures rise, so does the risk of tropical cyclones and intense storms. Experts say a warmer climate could produce fewer storms – but they will be much more destructive.

If you get caught in a flood situation, you can reduce health risks by avoiding the water.

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Oceans

The Causes and Effects of Oceanic Natural Disasters on Our Environment

August 23, 2019
oceanic natural disasters

Natural disasters wreak havoc on the people affected by them. When it comes to oceanic natural disasters, such as tsunamis, there are also substantial implications on the environment. We’ll explore some of them here. Tsunamis are long, high waves typically caused by underwater earthquakes occurring at tectonic plate boundaries. Most happen in areas that have above-average tectonic plate activity.

But, volcanic eruptions and undersea landslides can also trigger tsunamis, as could a meteorite hitting the ocean. Tsunamis reach top speeds of 500 miles per hour. That’s why it’s crucial to use early-warning systems that give people the information they need to seek shelter on higher ground before the disasters hit.

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Oceans

Threats to the Ocean From Poor Water Management

June 27, 2019
threats to the ocean

When you see a puddle on the street, or a flowerpot full of rain, it’s natural to think this water is separate from the ocean. After all, it’s miles from the coastline. The way we treat water that far inland shouldn’t have an effect on a marine ecosystem such a distance away — but it does.

In truth, all of the earth’s water is connected. The water cycle is a series of linked processes turning in an endless loop, from evaporation to precipitation and runoff. A seemingly harmless action may have consequences elsewhere, and large-scale mismanagement of water can result in serious threats to the ocean.

To visualize the idea, consider the path of a stream. The stream will eventually lead into a river, and the river will eventually lead into the sea. If someone pollutes the stream, it has far-reaching implications beyond the stream itself, causing issues as the contaminants travel toward their inevitable destination.

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Wildlife

How Aquatic Invasive Species Are Hurting Our Ecosystems

June 24, 2019
aquatic invasive species

The world consists of various ecosystems where native species to the area thrive. However, the only thing constant in the world is change. The science of evolution tells us that all organisms grow and adapt to different environments — most of these changes are for the good, but others can cause damage.

One such negative adaptation involves the introduction of aquatic invasive species into ecosystems where they compete with and eventually drive native species to extinction. As humans are responsible for the majority of the movement of these species, it is incumbent upon us to find solutions which protect all water-bound life for future generations.

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Oceans

Reclaimed Water May Be One of the Biggest Focuses of Wastewater in 2019

May 2, 2019
reclaimed water

As the global population grows and droughts hit many areas of the world, governments, businesses and individuals are looking for ways to ensure access to water. Reclaimed water is a major focus of these efforts and will likely get even more attention in 2019.

Reclaimed or recycled water is used more than once before being released back into the environment. It could refer to wastewater, stormwater, runoff and water from other sources. Depending on where it comes from and its intended use, the water may undergo treatment before reuse.

You can use reclaimed water for nearly any purpose as long as it’s treated adequately. You can use it to water farms, lawns and golf courses. Companies can apply it in their manufacturing processes. It can be used to fill lakes and fight fires. It can even be used as drinking water, although that requires more intensive treatment.

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Oceans

10 Ways to Prevent Ocean Noise Pollution

April 25, 2019
ocean noise pollution

The average person associates the word “pollution” with carbon emissions, chemicals and debris. Pollution takes the form of smoke, exhaust from vehicles, oil spills and the discarded refuse that contaminates the country’s coastlines. By comparison, noise pollution doesn’t receive nearly as much attention.

Even so, noise pollution is just as dangerous as the more visible manifestations of pollution. In certain environments, noise pollution can even prove deadly. You don’t have to look further than our oceans to find an example of this, with ocean noise pollution causing the death of precious marine life, including whales.
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Oceans

Ocean Heat Waves Threaten Marine Wildlife

April 8, 2019
ocean heat waves

You usually hear on the news about large heat waves that occur over land, but we rarely hear about them happening in the ocean. They do take place, and according to a new study published in Nature Climate Change, they’re becoming more frequent.

The paper, titled Marine Heatwaves Threaten Global Biodiversity and the Provision of Ecosystem Services, says marine heat wave days have increased by more than 54 percent over the last 30 years. These periods of abnormally high water temperatures for a given region not only became more frequent but also began lasting longer over the study period.

These trends, the study’s authors wrote, is consistent with decreasing amounts of marine life. Marine heat waves are another stress on seas that are already facing pollution, overfishing, declining oxygen levels, increasing acidity and other challenges.

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Oceans

Are We Depleting the Amount of Oxygen in the Ocean?

March 25, 2019
oxygen in the ocean

The level of oxygen in the ocean is falling, an issue scientists say calls for urgent attention. Decreasing oxygen levels could cause substantial harm to the health of the ocean and the life that depends on it.

Across the planet, oxygen levels have fallen by 2 percent in the last 50 years, according to research from GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel in Kiel, Germany. If the problem goes unchecked, global ocean oxygen levels could fall by an average of 7 percent by 2100. Another study found that in some tropical regions, oxygen levels declined by as much as 40 percent. For every degree the ocean warms, oxygen concentration decreases by 2 percent.

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Oceans

People Are Aware of Ocean Changes. Now, How Do We Stop Those Changes?

March 7, 2019
ocean changes

The effect of climate change on our oceans is inarguable, and more than that, distressing. As acidity levels rise, the delicate balance of marine ecosystems has started to tip, affecting countless species of fish and plant life that depend on environmental stability to survive. We’ve already seen the consequences.

Coral bleaching events have increased in frequency, leaving large areas of the world’s reefs pale and weak. Diseases like white syndrome are gaining traction, compounding the problem, and pollution from packaging, bottles and spills have all contributed to detrimental, large-scale ocean changes across the globe.

While this situation is admittedly upsetting, more and more people are beginning to acknowledge the effect their actions have on the environment. They’ve adopted eco-friendly lifestyles that reduce their emissions and waste, and many have corrected their bad habits, doing away with single-use plastics for green alternatives.

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Oceans

Deadly Threat to Coral Reef From Disease

February 18, 2019

In 2013, researchers off the coast of Christmas Island discovered something shocking. The coral reef they’d visited only five years earlier was skeletal and dead, its tissue destroyed and bone-like. The cause of the deterioration was a disease called white syndrome, and even now, in 2019, scientists are still baffled.

While white syndrome has many of the qualities of coral bleaching — draining the life and color from a coral reef — the disease is far more deadly. Instead of stressing the coral until it expels its algae, white syndrome kills a reef completely, leaving nothing behind but a bare structure of what it once was.

What is white syndrome, and how can researchers hope to address the problem? Let’s dive into the strange and mysterious depths of this growing phenomenon.

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